Australian Dance TheatreAustralian Dance Theatre

Australian Dance Theatre is the pre-eminent contemporary dance company in Australia and has been producing consistently extraordinary new dance since it was formed in Adelaide in 1965.

Under the artistic direction of Garry Stewart since 1999, the company has embarked on a distinctive artistic trajectory that has won the company numerous accolades praising Garry Stewart’s choreography and this formidable ensemble. 126 Belair Road, Hawthorn South Australia, 5062Australian Dance Theatre is the pre-eminent contemporary dance company in Australia and has been producing consistently extraordinary new dance since it was formed in Adelaide in 1965.

Under the artistic direction of Garry Stewart since 1999, the company has embarked on a distinctive artistic trajectory that has won the company numerous accolades praising Garry Stewart’s choreography and this formidable ensemble. 126 Belair Road, Hawthorn South Australia, 5062

Bucharest National Opera Ballet CompanyBucharest National Opera Ballet Company

The Romanian Opera House was established on April 1st, 1921. In 1924, Anton Romanovski moved to Romania and set up the first ballet company of the opera. The former prime-soloist of Polish origin had danced with Vaslav Nijinski, Anna Pavlova, Tamara Karsavina and Matilda Ksesinska. The first ballet performances staged by him are strongly influenced by the style of the choreographer Mihail Fokin.

In 1929 Vera Carally, graduate of the Imperial Ballet School from Moscow, former prime-ballerina at Balshoi Theatre and member of the “Russian Ballets”, took over the company. She staged “Swan Lake” in 1932, by the initial choreography, with an entirely Romanian ensemble. In the same year, more Romanian ballets had their premiere: “At the market” and “Miss Mariuta” by Mihail Jora, “Wedding in the Carpathians” by Paul Constantinescu.

The first ballet master of the company was Floria Capsali, whose activity started in 1938. She expanded the number of dancers, promoted the young soloists in main roles, formed a generation of assistants and she closely took care of them. In works as “The Mystery” by Mihai Andricu, “Priculiciul” by Zeno Vancea or “The Carnival” by Robert Schumann, she created an original mixture of folklore and educated dance.

After the World War II, Russian ballet masters and choreographers were invited and they staged “The fountain of Baccisarai” by Boris Asafiev (c.: Seda Vasilieva),”Seherazade” by Rimski-Korsakov and “The red poppy” by Reinhold Glier (c.: Ivan Kurilor), “The copper horseman” by Reinhold Glier (c.: Igor Smirnov).

Starting with 1953, after the inauguration of the present-day theatre building, the repertoire was enriched with divertimentos from operas and dancing miniatures amounting to about 50 works in different styles, from academic to neoclassical and modern: “The Romanian Rhapsody” by George Enescu, “Prelude for the Afternoon of a faun” by Claude Debussy, “Rhapsody in blue” by George Gershwin, “Seherazade” by Rimski-Korsakov etc.

In 1957 Oleg Danovski restaged “Swan Lake”, Tilde Urseanu staged “The Nutcracker”, and Vasile Marcu staged “Giselle” by Adolphe Charles Adam, “Sleeping Beauty” by P.I. Ceaikovski and “Romeo and Juliet” by Serghei Prokofiev. Among the original choreographies there were: “Concert in F” by George Gershwin and “Fantastic Symphony” by Hector Berlioz with a choreography by Oleg Danovski, “The Cocked hat” by Manuel De Falla and “Seherazade” by Rimski-Korsakov with a choreography by Vasile Marcu, “Bolero” by Maurice Ravel, “Petruska” by Igor Stravinsky, “The Little Serenade” by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and “The unfinished symphony” by Franz Schubert with a choreography by Tilde Urseanu. In the same time, the repertoire of the ballet company promoted works such as: “The Outlaws” by Hilda Jerea with a choreography by Vasile Marcu, “Calin” by Alfred Mendelssohn with a choreography by Tilde Urseanu, “The Prince and the Bagger” by Laurentiu Profeta, “Nastasia” by Cornel Trailescu with a choreography by Oleg Danovski.

Due to their exceptional artistic performance appreciated on the occasion of their participation to international ballet contests or similar festivals and during the many long tours they made, some of the prime-soloists received the international recognition which situates them among the ballet stars: Irinel Liciu, Gabriel Popescu , Valentina Massini, Sergiu Stefanski, Magdalena Popa, Ileana Iliescu, Elena Dacian, Gheorghe Cotovelea, Marinel Stefanescu, Petre Ciortea, Ioan Tugearu, Rodica Simion.

Starting with 1965, after a tour in Paris with the work of Stere Popescu “The hammer without master” by Pierre Boulez, many ballet dancers chose to go on with their career abroad, working as ballet masters and teachers until today: Magdalena Popa, Sergiu Stefanski (Canada), Marinel Stefanescu, Stefan Banica, George Bodnarciuc (Italy), Pavel Rotaru, Marin Boeru (USA), Aurora Rotaru (Swede), Cristina Hamel, Florentina Cristali, Rodica Simion (Germany), Gelu Barbu (Spain), Gigi Caciuleanu, Ruxandra Racovitza (France).

Over the years, a great number of foreign famous dancers performed on the stage of the opera in Bucharest unforgettable performances: Vladimir Vasiliev, Ekaterina Maximmova, Mihail Baryshnicov, Maina Gielgud, Elisabeth Platel, Jean Guizerix, Willfried Piollet, Margot Fonteyn, Birgit Culberg, Mats Ek, Andrian Fadeev, Anton Bogov, Giuseppe Picone, Alina Cojocaru, Johan Kobborg. The faithful public of the ballet performances of the opera had the opportunity to applaud with admiration companies as Kirov Theatre, Balshoi Theatre from Moscow, Royal English Ballet in London, Hamburg Ballet, Miami Atlanta Ballet from USA, Culberg Ballet from Sweden, Opera from Athens, Komische Oper from Berlin, beside contemporary dance companies led by Gigi Caciuleanu, Karine Saporta and Josepj Nadj from France and Nederlands Dans Theatre.

After 1990, under the artistic management of Ioan Tugearu (1990-1993), of Ileana Iliescu (1993-2001), of Mihai Babuska (2001-2008) and of Gheorghe Iancu (2008-2009) the repertoire of the company included works such as: “Romeo and Juliet” by Serghei Prokofiev, “The Hunchback of Notre-Dame” (musical collage), “Anna Karenina” (collage from P.I.Tchaikovsky) with a choreography by Ioan Tugearu, “Sleeping beauty” by P.I.Tchaikovsky, “Carmina Burana” by Carl Off, “The Nutcracker” by P.I.Tchaikovsky, “Red and Black” by Livia Teodorescu with a choreography by Alexa Mezincescu, “Daphnis and Chloe” by Maurice Ravel with a choreography by Gelu Barbu, “La Bayadère” by Ludwig Minkus , “Le Corsaire” by Adolphe Charles Adam with a choreography by Marius Petipa, “Fantastic Symphony” by Hector Berlioz with a choreography by Gigi Caciuleanu, or the last productions: “Swan Lake” by P.I.Tchaikovsky and “Women” (musical collage) with a choreography by Gheorghe Iancu.

Starting with may 2009, the Bucharest National Opera ballet company is managed by Ph.D. Simona Somacescu. The Romanian Opera House was established on April 1st, 1921. In 1924, Anton Romanovski moved to Romania and set up the first ballet company of the opera. The former prime-soloist of Polish origin had danced with Vaslav Nijinski, Anna Pavlova, Tamara Karsavina and Matilda Ksesinska. The first ballet performances staged by him are strongly influenced by the style of the choreographer Mihail Fokin.

In 1929 Vera Carally, graduate of the Imperial Ballet School from Moscow, former prime-ballerina at Balshoi Theatre and member of the “Russian Ballets”, took over the company. She staged “Swan Lake” in 1932, by the initial choreography, with an entirely Romanian ensemble. In the same year, more Romanian ballets had their premiere: “At the market” and “Miss Mariuta” by Mihail Jora, “Wedding in the Carpathians” by Paul Constantinescu.

The first ballet master of the company was Floria Capsali, whose activity started in 1938. She expanded the number of dancers, promoted the young soloists in main roles, formed a generation of assistants and she closely took care of them. In works as “The Mystery” by Mihai Andricu, “Priculiciul” by Zeno Vancea or “The Carnival” by Robert Schumann, she created an original mixture of folklore and educated dance.

After the World War II, Russian ballet masters and choreographers were invited and they staged “The fountain of Baccisarai” by Boris Asafiev (c.: Seda Vasilieva),”Seherazade” by Rimski-Korsakov and “The red poppy” by Reinhold Glier (c.: Ivan Kurilor), “The copper horseman” by Reinhold Glier (c.: Igor Smirnov).

Starting with 1953, after the inauguration of the present-day theatre building, the repertoire was enriched with divertimentos from operas and dancing miniatures amounting to about 50 works in different styles, from academic to neoclassical and modern: “The Romanian Rhapsody” by George Enescu, “Prelude for the Afternoon of a faun” by Claude Debussy, “Rhapsody in blue” by George Gershwin, “Seherazade” by Rimski-Korsakov etc.

In 1957 Oleg Danovski restaged “Swan Lake”, Tilde Urseanu staged “The Nutcracker”, and Vasile Marcu staged “Giselle” by Adolphe Charles Adam, “Sleeping Beauty” by P.I. Ceaikovski and “Romeo and Juliet” by Serghei Prokofiev. Among the original choreographies there were: “Concert in F” by George Gershwin and “Fantastic Symphony” by Hector Berlioz with a choreography by Oleg Danovski, “The Cocked hat” by Manuel De Falla and “Seherazade” by Rimski-Korsakov with a choreography by Vasile Marcu, “Bolero” by Maurice Ravel, “Petruska” by Igor Stravinsky, “The Little Serenade” by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and “The unfinished symphony” by Franz Schubert with a choreography by Tilde Urseanu. In the same time, the repertoire of the ballet company promoted works such as: “The Outlaws” by Hilda Jerea with a choreography by Vasile Marcu, “Calin” by Alfred Mendelssohn with a choreography by Tilde Urseanu, “The Prince and the Bagger” by Laurentiu Profeta, “Nastasia” by Cornel Trailescu with a choreography by Oleg Danovski.

Due to their exceptional artistic performance appreciated on the occasion of their participation to international ballet contests or similar festivals and during the many long tours they made, some of the prime-soloists received the international recognition which situates them among the ballet stars: Irinel Liciu, Gabriel Popescu , Valentina Massini, Sergiu Stefanski, Magdalena Popa, Ileana Iliescu, Elena Dacian, Gheorghe Cotovelea, Marinel Stefanescu, Petre Ciortea, Ioan Tugearu, Rodica Simion.

Starting with 1965, after a tour in Paris with the work of Stere Popescu “The hammer without master” by Pierre Boulez, many ballet dancers chose to go on with their career abroad, working as ballet masters and teachers until today: Magdalena Popa, Sergiu Stefanski (Canada), Marinel Stefanescu, Stefan Banica, George Bodnarciuc (Italy), Pavel Rotaru, Marin Boeru (USA), Aurora Rotaru (Swede), Cristina Hamel, Florentina Cristali, Rodica Simion (Germany), Gelu Barbu (Spain), Gigi Caciuleanu, Ruxandra Racovitza (France).

Over the years, a great number of foreign famous dancers performed on the stage of the opera in Bucharest unforgettable performances: Vladimir Vasiliev, Ekaterina Maximmova, Mihail Baryshnicov, Maina Gielgud, Elisabeth Platel, Jean Guizerix, Willfried Piollet, Margot Fonteyn, Birgit Culberg, Mats Ek, Andrian Fadeev, Anton Bogov, Giuseppe Picone, Alina Cojocaru, Johan Kobborg. The faithful public of the ballet performances of the opera had the opportunity to applaud with admiration companies as Kirov Theatre, Balshoi Theatre from Moscow, Royal English Ballet in London, Hamburg Ballet, Miami Atlanta Ballet from USA, Culberg Ballet from Sweden, Opera from Athens, Komische Oper from Berlin, beside contemporary dance companies led by Gigi Caciuleanu, Karine Saporta and Josepj Nadj from France and Nederlands Dans Theatre.

After 1990, under the artistic management of Ioan Tugearu (1990-1993), of Ileana Iliescu (1993-2001), of Mihai Babuska (2001-2008) and of Gheorghe Iancu (2008-2009) the repertoire of the company included works such as: “Romeo and Juliet” by Serghei Prokofiev, “The Hunchback of Notre-Dame” (musical collage), “Anna Karenina” (collage from P.I.Tchaikovsky) with a choreography by Ioan Tugearu, “Sleeping beauty” by P.I.Tchaikovsky, “Carmina Burana” by Carl Off, “The Nutcracker” by P.I.Tchaikovsky, “Red and Black” by Livia Teodorescu with a choreography by Alexa Mezincescu, “Daphnis and Chloe” by Maurice Ravel with a choreography by Gelu Barbu, “La Bayadère” by Ludwig Minkus , “Le Corsaire” by Adolphe Charles Adam with a choreography by Marius Petipa, “Fantastic Symphony” by Hector Berlioz with a choreography by Gigi Caciuleanu, or the last productions: “Swan Lake” by P.I.Tchaikovsky and “Women” (musical collage) with a choreography by Gheorghe Iancu.

Starting with may 2009, the Bucharest National Opera ballet company is managed by Ph.D. Simona Somacescu.

Serbian National BalletSerbian National Ballet

Throughout its rich history, the audiences of National Theatre in Belgrade had seen many guest performing of best dancers, singers and actors of their time. The constant quality of the repertoire that merges good tradition with contemporary approach, along with the outstanding level of performing quality is our artistic trademark. Productions of the National Theatre in Belgrade are touring the country and abroad, reconnecting with the family of best European theatres that we belong to. The ballet is an essential part of the National Theatre in Belgrade. The Serbian National Ballet is famous mostly for his world premières, as the “Anna Karenina” by the Russian composer Schedrin, as well as “The Legend from Ohrid” by the Serbian artist S. Hristic.

The Artistic Director of the Ballet of the National Theatre in Belgrade is Bruce Steivel.
Previously, Mr. Steivel served as the Artistic Director of Bern Stadt Theatre in Switzerland, the Hong Kong Ballet, the Universal Ballet of Korea and most recently Nevada Ballet Theatre, where he served as artistic director for over a decade. Bruce Steivel is an internationally recognized choreographer and teacher.
Graduating from the North Carolina School of the Arts, Mr. Steivel continued his studies on full scholarship with the American School of Ballet, American Ballet Theatre and the Harkness House for Ballet Arts. He has trained and worked under some of dance’s most famous teachers and choreographers including George Balanchine, Jiri Kylian, Roland Petit, Anton Dolin, Ben Stevenson, Andre Eglevsky, Alexandra Danoliva, David Howard and Heinz Spoerli.
As a dancer, Mr. Steivel danced every major role in the classical repertoire, including Romeo in Romeo and Juliet, Albrecht in Giselle, Franz in Coppelia and the Prince in Nutcracker, to name a few. His contemporary repertoire included working with such notables as Sir Frederick Ashton, Hans van Manen, Jiri Kylian and Maurice Bejart.
As Artistic Director for the Hong Kong Ballet and the Universal Ballet, Mr. Steivel developed a strong internationally accepted company and launched each company on their first American and European tours. Hong Kong Ballet’s tour to mainland China was the first time the Hong Kong based company performed in China.
As Artistic Director of Nevada Ballet Theatre, Mr. Steivel expanded the repertoire by adding 30 ballets – 13 from visiting choreographers and 17 from of his own creation. His Nutcracker was a holiday favorite, along with Peter Pan, A Midsummer Night’s Dream and Good Times. Several of his works are in the repertoire of five major dance companies.
Mr. Steivel is frequently sought after as a guest teacher, teaching for Nederland Dans Theatre, the Norwegian National Ballet, the Hungarian National Ballet, the National Ballet of Portugal, the Berlin Stadstoper, Beijing Ballet, Shanghai Ballet, Bat-Dor of Israel, the National Institute of Istanbul, Turkey and numerous schools in Japan and America.
His international involvement continues with his position as the Artistic Director for the prestigious International Concours de Danse in Luxembourg, under the patronage of the Grande Duc and Duchess of Luxembourg. Throughout its rich history, the audiences of National Theatre in Belgrade had seen many guest performing of best dancers, singers and actors of their time. The constant quality of the repertoire that merges good tradition with contemporary approach, along with the outstanding level of performing quality is our artistic trademark. Productions of the National Theatre in Belgrade are touring the country and abroad, reconnecting with the family of best European theatres that we belong to. The ballet is an essential part of the National Theatre in Belgrade. The Serbian National Ballet is famous mostly for his world premières, as the “Anna Karenina” by the Russian composer Schedrin, as well as “The Legend from Ohrid” by the Serbian artist S. Hristic.

The Artistic Director of the Ballet of the National Theatre in Belgrade is Bruce Steivel.
Previously, Mr. Steivel served as the Artistic Director of Bern Stadt Theatre in Switzerland, the Hong Kong Ballet, the Universal Ballet of Korea and most recently Nevada Ballet Theatre, where he served as artistic director for over a decade. Bruce Steivel is an internationally recognized choreographer and teacher.
Graduating from the North Carolina School of the Arts, Mr. Steivel continued his studies on full scholarship with the American School of Ballet, American Ballet Theatre and the Harkness House for Ballet Arts. He has trained and worked under some of dance’s most famous teachers and choreographers including George Balanchine, Jiri Kylian, Roland Petit, Anton Dolin, Ben Stevenson, Andre Eglevsky, Alexandra Danoliva, David Howard and Heinz Spoerli.
As a dancer, Mr. Steivel danced every major role in the classical repertoire, including Romeo in Romeo and Juliet, Albrecht in Giselle, Franz in Coppelia and the Prince in Nutcracker, to name a few. His contemporary repertoire included working with such notables as Sir Frederick Ashton, Hans van Manen, Jiri Kylian and Maurice Bejart.
As Artistic Director for the Hong Kong Ballet and the Universal Ballet, Mr. Steivel developed a strong internationally accepted company and launched each company on their first American and European tours. Hong Kong Ballet’s tour to mainland China was the first time the Hong Kong based company performed in China.
As Artistic Director of Nevada Ballet Theatre, Mr. Steivel expanded the repertoire by adding 30 ballets – 13 from visiting choreographers and 17 from of his own creation. His Nutcracker was a holiday favorite, along with Peter Pan, A Midsummer Night’s Dream and Good Times. Several of his works are in the repertoire of five major dance companies.
Mr. Steivel is frequently sought after as a guest teacher, teaching for Nederland Dans Theatre, the Norwegian National Ballet, the Hungarian National Ballet, the National Ballet of Portugal, the Berlin Stadstoper, Beijing Ballet, Shanghai Ballet, Bat-Dor of Israel, the National Institute of Istanbul, Turkey and numerous schools in Japan and America.
His international involvement continues with his position as the Artistic Director for the prestigious International Concours de Danse in Luxembourg, under the patronage of the Grande Duc and Duchess of Luxembourg.

The Polish Dance TheatreThe Polish Dance Theatre

The Polish Dance Theatre – Poznań Ballet was established in 1973 on the initiative of the city authorities and local artistic circles. The job of managing it was given to Conrad Drzewiecki, an outstanding dancer and choreographer.
Drzewiecki’s 15 years at the helm were characterised by pioneer accomplishments which placed the Poznań Ballet among Europe’s leading dance ensembles and opened the door to international ballet festivals.

In 1988 Ewa Wycichowska took over as the manager and artistic director of the Polish Dance Theatre. Wycichowska, for many years the prima ballerina of the Wielki Theatre in Łódź, choreographer and teacher, had cooperated with numerous American, Italian and German ensembles and sat on the jury of many Polish and international ballet competitions.
Treating modern and contemporary dance as the basic movement material, Ewa Wycichowska developed an original concept of performance and choreography that aims at a synthesis of arts in which the choreographic, dramatic, musical and visual layers meet and intermingle. She also made her own contribution to the idea of individualistic theatre and invited the cooperation of many distinguished artists from all over the world.

For some years now the Polish Dance Theatre has been perceived as a unique choreography forum, which has seen original choreographies by such artists as Birgit Cullberg, Mats Ek, Örjan Andersson, Jens Ostberg, Marie Brolin-Tani, Virpi Pahkinen (Sweden), “Les Carnetes Bogouet” (France), David Earle (Canada), Toru Shimazaki (Japan), Yossi Berg (Israel) and Jacek Przybyłowicz (Poland).
The Polish Dance Theatre\’s attractive repertoire, original dance language and contemporary theatre form have attracted universal praise from audiences all over the world.

For 35 years The Polish Dance Theatre, though based in Poznań, has remained faithful to its statutory obligation to promote the art of dancing and disseminate ballet culture throughout the country. And adding an educational perspective to its wide spectrum of interests, the theatre started organising the Contemporary Dance Workshops and the Contemporary Dance Biennale in 1994 and the International Festival of Dance Theatres in 2004. The Polish Dance Theatre – Poznań Ballet was established in 1973 on the initiative of the city authorities and local artistic circles. The job of managing it was given to Conrad Drzewiecki, an outstanding dancer and choreographer.
Drzewiecki’s 15 years at the helm were characterised by pioneer accomplishments which placed the Poznań Ballet among Europe’s leading dance ensembles and opened the door to international ballet festivals.

In 1988 Ewa Wycichowska took over as the manager and artistic director of the Polish Dance Theatre. Wycichowska, for many years the prima ballerina of the Wielki Theatre in Łódź, choreographer and teacher, had cooperated with numerous American, Italian and German ensembles and sat on the jury of many Polish and international ballet competitions.
Treating modern and contemporary dance as the basic movement material, Ewa Wycichowska developed an original concept of performance and choreography that aims at a synthesis of arts in which the choreographic, dramatic, musical and visual layers meet and intermingle. She also made her own contribution to the idea of individualistic theatre and invited the cooperation of many distinguished artists from all over the world.

For some years now the Polish Dance Theatre has been perceived as a unique choreography forum, which has seen original choreographies by such artists as Birgit Cullberg, Mats Ek, Örjan Andersson, Jens Ostberg, Marie Brolin-Tani, Virpi Pahkinen (Sweden), “Les Carnetes Bogouet” (France), David Earle (Canada), Toru Shimazaki (Japan), Yossi Berg (Israel) and Jacek Przybyłowicz (Poland).
The Polish Dance Theatre\’s attractive repertoire, original dance language and contemporary theatre form have attracted universal praise from audiences all over the world.

For 35 years The Polish Dance Theatre, though based in Poznań, has remained faithful to its statutory obligation to promote the art of dancing and disseminate ballet culture throughout the country. And adding an educational perspective to its wide spectrum of interests, the theatre started organising the Contemporary Dance Workshops and the Contemporary Dance Biennale in 1994 and the International Festival of Dance Theatres in 2004.

Polish National BalletPolish National Ballet

The Polish National Ballet is Poland’s largest ballet company, with plenty of excellent local and foreign dancers guaranteeing a high standard of performances. It reflects the character, energy, and aspirations of Polish society. The company works and performs at the Teatr Wielki, sharing the stage with the Polish National Opera.
The 2011/12 season continues the programme guidelines adopted in 2009, when the ballet company of the Teatr Wielki – Polish National Opera in Warsaw under my management gained artistic autonomy as the Polish National Ballet. Following the long tradition of the Warsaw ballet company, we cultivate classical, neoclassical, and contemporary repertoire. This season we will present a great new production of The Nutcracker by Toer van Schayk and Wayne Eagling, La Bayadère in a production by Natalia Makarova, and Cinderella with choreography by Frederick Ashton. Our proposals also include ballets by choreographers such as George Balanchine (The Prodigal Son), Vaslav Nijinsky, Maurice Béjart, and Emanuel Gat (three different versions of The Rite of Spring), and works by Polish artists: Robert Bondara (Persona), Jacek Przybyłowicz (Six Wings of Angels), Emil Wesołowski (Romeo and Juliet, Cain and Abel), and two of my own ballets: And the Rain Will Pass… and Tristan. The repertoire features a chamber evening designed for guest performances which includes a dance suite from my production Kurt Weill, Robert Bondara’s When You End and I Begin…, Jacek Tyski’s Afternoon of a Faun and Ed Wubbe’s The Green.
We are also continuing our annual choreography workshops, called Creations. These give our dancers the opportunity to debut as choreographers. One of the participants in the previous workshops was Robert Bondara, who presented his smaller choreographic forms and has now moved on to a larger original premiere, Persona, on the Chamber Stage.
As usual, we open the season in September with the latest Days of Dance at the Teatr Wielki, presenting our own productions as well as performances by companies invited from France, The Netherlands, Germany, and Japan. The most important event of this year’s festival will be the Tanztheater Wuppertal in performances of works by the legendary Pina Bausch who passed away not long ago. The Polish National Ballet, meanwhile, will present La Bayadère in Seville, and The Rite of Spring at the festivals in Poznań, Kielce and Bydgoszcz. We have also been invited to take part in the international Kuopio Dance Festival.
I encourage our fans to follow the latest news from the Polish National Ballet on our website, www.polskibaletnarodowy.pl. We look forward to seeing you at our ballet performances. The Polish National Ballet is Poland’s largest ballet company, with plenty of excellent local and foreign dancers guaranteeing a high standard of performances. It reflects the character, energy, and aspirations of Polish society. The company works and performs at the Teatr Wielki, sharing the stage with the Polish National Opera.
The 2011/12 season continues the programme guidelines adopted in 2009, when the ballet company of the Teatr Wielki – Polish National Opera in Warsaw under my management gained artistic autonomy as the Polish National Ballet. Following the long tradition of the Warsaw ballet company, we cultivate classical, neoclassical, and contemporary repertoire. This season we will present a great new production of The Nutcracker by Toer van Schayk and Wayne Eagling, La Bayadère in a production by Natalia Makarova, and Cinderella with choreography by Frederick Ashton. Our proposals also include ballets by choreographers such as George Balanchine (The Prodigal Son), Vaslav Nijinsky, Maurice Béjart, and Emanuel Gat (three different versions of The Rite of Spring), and works by Polish artists: Robert Bondara (Persona), Jacek Przybyłowicz (Six Wings of Angels), Emil Wesołowski (Romeo and Juliet, Cain and Abel), and two of my own ballets: And the Rain Will Pass… and Tristan. The repertoire features a chamber evening designed for guest performances which includes a dance suite from my production Kurt Weill, Robert Bondara’s When You End and I Begin…, Jacek Tyski’s Afternoon of a Faun and Ed Wubbe’s The Green.
We are also continuing our annual choreography workshops, called Creations. These give our dancers the opportunity to debut as choreographers. One of the participants in the previous workshops was Robert Bondara, who presented his smaller choreographic forms and has now moved on to a larger original premiere, Persona, on the Chamber Stage.
As usual, we open the season in September with the latest Days of Dance at the Teatr Wielki, presenting our own productions as well as performances by companies invited from France, The Netherlands, Germany, and Japan. The most important event of this year’s festival will be the Tanztheater Wuppertal in performances of works by the legendary Pina Bausch who passed away not long ago. The Polish National Ballet, meanwhile, will present La Bayadère in Seville, and The Rite of Spring at the festivals in Poznań, Kielce and Bydgoszcz. We have also been invited to take part in the international Kuopio Dance Festival.
I encourage our fans to follow the latest news from the Polish National Ballet on our website, www.polskibaletnarodowy.pl. We look forward to seeing you at our ballet performances.

Baltic Dance TheaterBaltic Dance Theater

The Baltic Dance Theatre started its existence on March 1, 2010 but already two years earlier young, talented dancers started arriving in Gdańsk from all over Poland to strengthen the small, yet dynamically developing Baltic Opera ballet team. Consecutive premieres: 4&4 and Eurasia choreographed by Izadora Weiss, Men’s Dance by Wojciech Misiuro, Jacek Przybyłowicz and Roman Komassa and finally Romeo and Juliet and Out by Izadora Weiss, confirmed that the Gdańsk team created a new quality with its modern dance spectacles. The Baltic Dance Theatre dancers are all outstanding individuals. Some of them are graduates of Polish ballet schools, others have no formal ballet education but have enormous practical experience. In spite of different roads they have taken to reach their aim, today they perform on the same stage. They have been united by their striving for perfection and love for dance. Together they make a company which has won the hearts of the young Tricity (Gdańsk, Sopot, Gdynia) audience.

Izadora Weiss is the artistic director of the BDT. She professes the belief that body movement must be led by the spirit of music and makes sense only when the two create an indissoluble unity. She tries to convey positive emotions in the stories told by her spectacles and she defends a value system in which love, human worth, faithfulness to one’s ideals and to people we choose, the love of truth and justice are always present, despite the fashion for destruction promoted in modern culture, or subculture, as she defines it herself.

Emil Wesołowski, longtime director of the National Ballet, praised skills and passion of this company, with whom he produced his extraordinary spectacle Chopinart. The choreographer Jacek Przybyłowicz, who worked with them on the Men’s Dance première, during a TV interview prophesied a great career for the company. Furthermore Wojciech Misiuro, the legendary creator of Teatr Ekspresja, was highly impressed by the dancers’ skills. These good opinions are confirmed by the fact that the above-mentioned artists want to continue working with the BDT in the future. Jan Kozłowski, the former Marshall of the Pomorskie Province, at the beginning of 2010, when there was still no talk about Baltic Dance Theatre, described the changes in our team as follows: “The Baltic Opera Ballet has been put through most radical reforms. Marek Weiss has decided to build a modern dance team from scratch. Four consecutive premieres have been welcomed more and more enthusiastically by the audience and the local critics. The most recently produced spectacle – Romeo and Juliet by Izadora Weiss – was given standing ovations every time it was shown. I had a chance to see the broadcasts of the Eurasia and Romeo and Juliet ballets on TVP Kultura, and you can find fragments of all Gdańsk Opera productions on every known internet platform and on the most important music TV channel in the world – MEZZO.”

A proposition from the BBC has come to be a confirmation of these words. Its music department, looking for a choreographer who would stand out among the recent wave of modern dance producers, decided to make a film about Izadora Weiss and her young team. For the BDT, the artistic ideal and an example, they wish to follow is the Nederland Dans Theater shaped by Jiri Kylian’s choreographies – Izadora Weiss’s master and teacher. He decided to send her, for a good beginning of her independent artistic career, the NDT team to Gdańsk, for a guest performance of the spectacle Last Touch First within the framework of the Baltic Dance Theatres Festival which would surely bring magic luck to the Gdańsk dancers and their fascinating work. In the spectacle, we can see former Nederland Dans Theater dancers under chorographic lead of Jiří Kylián and Michael Schumacher.

The latest BDT premiere is an evening consisting of the spectacle Sen (Dream) with the music of Arvo Part, choreographed by Wojciech Misiuro, and the most difficult challenge when it comes to their repertoire – The Rite of Spring by Igor Stravinsky. This spectacle, choreographed by Izadora Weiss, opens a new phase is BDT’s activities and creates hope for it to become a source of pride not only for the Baltic Opera and the Pomorskie Province but also for the always supporting it Tricity audience.

Nowadays, BDT performs Rite of Springs together with Waiting for…, a new choreography of Izadora Weiss, which had its premiere on 2011 August during VIII International Dance Theatre Festival in Poznan. Jiri Kylian has watched both performances while visiting our Baltic Dance Theatre Encounters. He recognized our young dancers and their boss’s skill and honest effort. As a proof of his praise he declared his cooperation in preparing the next premiere. And so BDT will be joining small group of dance theatres with Kylian’s choreographies in the repertoire, and Izadora Weiss will be one of few choreographers honored to be at the master’s side during performance evening. The premiere of that special event will be on 2012 May 26th and will consist of Kylian’s choreography with Webern music No More Play and
Mozart’s Six Dances along with Weiss’s choreography Windows to new music of Leszek Mozdzer. The Baltic Dance Theatre started its existence on March 1, 2010 but already two years earlier young, talented dancers started arriving in Gdańsk from all over Poland to strengthen the small, yet dynamically developing Baltic Opera ballet team. Consecutive premieres: 4&4 and Eurasia choreographed by Izadora Weiss, Men’s Dance by Wojciech Misiuro, Jacek Przybyłowicz and Roman Komassa and finally Romeo and Juliet and Out by Izadora Weiss, confirmed that the Gdańsk team created a new quality with its modern dance spectacles. The Baltic Dance Theatre dancers are all outstanding individuals. Some of them are graduates of Polish ballet schools, others have no formal ballet education but have enormous practical experience. In spite of different roads they have taken to reach their aim, today they perform on the same stage. They have been united by their striving for perfection and love for dance. Together they make a company which has won the hearts of the young Tricity (Gdańsk, Sopot, Gdynia) audience.

Izadora Weiss is the artistic director of the BDT. She professes the belief that body movement must be led by the spirit of music and makes sense only when the two create an indissoluble unity. She tries to convey positive emotions in the stories told by her spectacles and she defends a value system in which love, human worth, faithfulness to one’s ideals and to people we choose, the love of truth and justice are always present, despite the fashion for destruction promoted in modern culture, or subculture, as she defines it herself.

Emil Wesołowski, longtime director of the National Ballet, praised skills and passion of this company, with whom he produced his extraordinary spectacle Chopinart. The choreographer Jacek Przybyłowicz, who worked with them on the Men’s Dance première, during a TV interview prophesied a great career for the company. Furthermore Wojciech Misiuro, the legendary creator of Teatr Ekspresja, was highly impressed by the dancers’ skills. These good opinions are confirmed by the fact that the above-mentioned artists want to continue working with the BDT in the future. Jan Kozłowski, the former Marshall of the Pomorskie Province, at the beginning of 2010, when there was still no talk about Baltic Dance Theatre, described the changes in our team as follows: “The Baltic Opera Ballet has been put through most radical reforms. Marek Weiss has decided to build a modern dance team from scratch. Four consecutive premieres have been welcomed more and more enthusiastically by the audience and the local critics. The most recently produced spectacle – Romeo and Juliet by Izadora Weiss – was given standing ovations every time it was shown. I had a chance to see the broadcasts of the Eurasia and Romeo and Juliet ballets on TVP Kultura, and you can find fragments of all Gdańsk Opera productions on every known internet platform and on the most important music TV channel in the world – MEZZO.”

A proposition from the BBC has come to be a confirmation of these words. Its music department, looking for a choreographer who would stand out among the recent wave of modern dance producers, decided to make a film about Izadora Weiss and her young team. For the BDT, the artistic ideal and an example, they wish to follow is the Nederland Dans Theater shaped by Jiri Kylian’s choreographies – Izadora Weiss’s master and teacher. He decided to send her, for a good beginning of her independent artistic career, the NDT team to Gdańsk, for a guest performance of the spectacle Last Touch First within the framework of the Baltic Dance Theatres Festival which would surely bring magic luck to the Gdańsk dancers and their fascinating work. In the spectacle, we can see former Nederland Dans Theater dancers under chorographic lead of Jiří Kylián and Michael Schumacher.

The latest BDT premiere is an evening consisting of the spectacle Sen (Dream) with the music of Arvo Part, choreographed by Wojciech Misiuro, and the most difficult challenge when it comes to their repertoire – The Rite of Spring by Igor Stravinsky. This spectacle, choreographed by Izadora Weiss, opens a new phase is BDT’s activities and creates hope for it to become a source of pride not only for the Baltic Opera and the Pomorskie Province but also for the always supporting it Tricity audience.

Nowadays, BDT performs Rite of Springs together with Waiting for…, a new choreography of Izadora Weiss, which had its premiere on 2011 August during VIII International Dance Theatre Festival in Poznan. Jiri Kylian has watched both performances while visiting our Baltic Dance Theatre Encounters. He recognized our young dancers and their boss’s skill and honest effort. As a proof of his praise he declared his cooperation in preparing the next premiere. And so BDT will be joining small group of dance theatres with Kylian’s choreographies in the repertoire, and Izadora Weiss will be one of few choreographers honored to be at the master’s side during performance evening. The premiere of that special event will be on 2012 May 26th and will consist of Kylian’s choreography with Webern music No More Play and
Mozart’s Six Dances along with Weiss’s choreography Windows to new music of Leszek Mozdzer.

Singapore Dance TheatreSingapore Dance Theatre

The Singapore Dance Theatre (SDT) was founded in 1988 with seven dancers by Goh Soo Khim and Anthony Then. Located right on top of Fort Canning Hill, situated on the second storey of Cox Terrace, SDT has since developed into Singapore’s premier professional dance company comprising of 34 professional dancers. In 2002, SDT was honoured to have been given the opportunity to grace the official opening of the Esplanade – Theatres on the Bay with the opening performance of Boi Sakti’s Reminiscing the Moon. A decade on, SDT continues to have the privilege to perform in a world-class performing arts venue, exhilarating audiences with a myriad of repertoires. In the course of each year, the Company performs five to six seasons, with three full ballet performances at the stage of Esplanade Theatre. One of the highlights of the Company’s performance season each year would be the widely popular outdoor dance event – Ballet Under The Stars at the Fort Canning Park.

The Company’s repertoire ranges from classical to contemporary ballet, from renowned choreographers like Goh Choo San, George Balanchine, Nacho Duato, Jiri Kylian, Stanton Welch, Marie-Claude Pietragalla, Xing Liang, Mauricio Wainrot, Val Caniparoli, Graham Lustig, David Dawson, Jorma Elo, Edmund Stripe, Adrian Burnett, Edwaard Liang and Nils Christe.

In 2009, Janek Schergen took over the post of Artistic Director of SDT. Under his leadership, the Company has made new achievements in the international and Singapore dance arena. Janek is also the Artistic Director of the Choo-San Goh & H. Robert Magee Foundation which oversees the licensing and production of Choo San Goh’s ballets and the annual Choo San Goh Awards for Choreography.

SDT also actively reaches out to the public to create greater awareness of dance through outreach to schools with its Arts Education Programme, Dance Appreciation Series (jointly presented with Esplanade Co.), and One @ The Ballet, an initiative to help the public in gaining a better understanding of the different aspect of dance. SDT also created the Scholars Programme which is designed to be a pre-professional programme for student dancers who are seriously interested in the pursuit of a professional dance career. The Singapore Dance Theatre (SDT) was founded in 1988 with seven dancers by Goh Soo Khim and Anthony Then. Located right on top of Fort Canning Hill, situated on the second storey of Cox Terrace, SDT has since developed into Singapore’s premier professional dance company comprising of 34 professional dancers. In 2002, SDT was honoured to have been given the opportunity to grace the official opening of the Esplanade – Theatres on the Bay with the opening performance of Boi Sakti’s Reminiscing the Moon. A decade on, SDT continues to have the privilege to perform in a world-class performing arts venue, exhilarating audiences with a myriad of repertoires. In the course of each year, the Company performs five to six seasons, with three full ballet performances at the stage of Esplanade Theatre. One of the highlights of the Company’s performance season each year would be the widely popular outdoor dance event – Ballet Under The Stars at the Fort Canning Park.

The Company’s repertoire ranges from classical to contemporary ballet, from renowned choreographers like Goh Choo San, George Balanchine, Nacho Duato, Jiri Kylian, Stanton Welch, Marie-Claude Pietragalla, Xing Liang, Mauricio Wainrot, Val Caniparoli, Graham Lustig, David Dawson, Jorma Elo, Edmund Stripe, Adrian Burnett, Edwaard Liang and Nils Christe.

In 2009, Janek Schergen took over the post of Artistic Director of SDT. Under his leadership, the Company has made new achievements in the international and Singapore dance arena. Janek is also the Artistic Director of the Choo-San Goh & H. Robert Magee Foundation which oversees the licensing and production of Choo San Goh’s ballets and the annual Choo San Goh Awards for Choreography.

SDT also actively reaches out to the public to create greater awareness of dance through outreach to schools with its Arts Education Programme, Dance Appreciation Series (jointly presented with Esplanade Co.), and One @ The Ballet, an initiative to help the public in gaining a better understanding of the different aspect of dance. SDT also created the Scholars Programme which is designed to be a pre-professional programme for student dancers who are seriously interested in the pursuit of a professional dance career.

Slovak balletSlovak ballet

The beginnings of the Slovak ballet go back to the historic day of the first ballet premiere of Coppélia by C. Ph. L. Delibes on May 19, 1920. The choreography was by Vaclav Kalina, the first artistic director of the SND Ballet. In the season 1922 – 1923 this position was taken over by Czech dancer Marta Aubrechtová.

Oskar Nedbal, Director of the SND, invited the Italian ballet master and choreographer Achille Viscusi to Bratislava for the season 1923 – 1924. For the next eight years Viscusi was playing an important role in professionalizing the ensemble as well as the repertoire. He staged such works as From Fairy Tale to Fairy Tale, A Tale about John, Princess Hyacinth, and Andersen (music by O. Nedbal), Slavonic Dances (music by A. Dvořák), The Swan Lake, The Nutcracker, Giselle, Sheherazade, Sylvia (music by L. Delibes), etc. In the years 1931 – 1933 the position of Viscusi was taken over by his pupil, the dancer Ella Fuchsová- Lehotská, who was also known for her private ballet school. The ensemble presented Nicotina (music by V. Novák), The Firebird, Mr. Twardowski (music by L. Roźycki), and many more. The other principal dancers, apart from Fuchsová-Lehotská, were among others O. Janatová-Doušová, A. and I. Vésceyová, V. Jassik, I. R. Stuchlý, J. Jercký, E. Gabzdyl.

After this very successful period other Czech choreographers followed. In 1933 – 1935 Vladimir Pirnikov with the ballet Raymonda, then again E. Fuchsová-Lehotská with Ajanta Frescoes (music by A. N. Tcherepnin), and finally Bohumil Relský with The Christmas Eve Dream (music by M. S. Anger), and A Wedding in the Ukraine (music by O. Fröhlich) in the season of 1937 – 1940. At that time the principal dancers were E. Kováčová, N. Pirniková, M. Chocová, E. Velínska, G. Schmidtová, E. Šajová-Jaczová, V. Libovický, and others.

Between 1940 – 1945 Director of the SND was Maximilián Froman, the representative of the Russian ballet school and member of the world-famous ensemble Ballets Russes. He acquainted the public with the repertoire of Diaghilev’s ensemble by presenting such works as Sheherazade, Les Papillons, Carnival, Polovetz Dances, Sylfides and The Sleeping Beauty. The ensemble also presented ballets by the Croatian composer K. Baranovič Imbrek with a Nose and The Gingerbread Heart. At that time the ensemble was joined by the Bulgarian ballerina M. Vasileva and by B. Füssegger.

In the years 1948 – 1955 Stanislav Remar markedly influenced the dramaturgy of the SND Ballet by presenting the first Slovak ballet Orfeus and Eurydike by T. Andrašovan (1949), and by staging works such as The Flames of Paris, The Fountain of Bakhchisaray, Prokofiev´s Cinderella and Romeo and Juliet, and by foreign guest choreographers: the representative of the Russian school, Alexander R.Tomsky, who staged The Red Poppy (music by R. M. Glier), and the Hungarian choreographer, Gyula Harangozó, who staged The Kerchief (music by J. Kenessey). Next was Jozef Zajko, the first Slovak theatrical choreographer, who staged the first ballet with Slovak motif The Knight´s Ballad by Šimon Jurovský (1960). Soloists were T. Isičenková, G. Basová, A. Herényi-Starostová, J. Manšingrová, G. Tašká-Boudová, J. Mňačková, J. Zajko, T. Beňo, F. O. Bernatik, M. Herényi, V. Marek, L. Lejko, H. Volejníček, P. M. Rapoš, etc.

The coming of Karol Tóth to the post of the artistic director of the SND Ballet (1960 – 1972) marked new independence of the ensemble. His first choreography was Fadetta by L. Delibes. During his leadership Marilena Tóthová and Jozef Zajko took part in creating the repertoire. The SND Ballet presented important premieres of some original works, e.g. Ikaros (music by T. Andrašovan), The Ninth Wave (music by K. Odstrčil), The Command (music by V. Bukový), and ballets such as Voyage in a Storm (music by A. Kara-Karajev), The Scythian Suite (music by S. S. Prokofiev), Don Quixote, Servant of Two Masters (music by J. Burghauser), Snow White and Seven Dwarfs (music by Z. Vostřák), The Rites of Spring, Love, the Magician, Peter and Wolf – choreography by Karol. Tóth. The ballets Doctor Auch (music by I. V. Morozov), Girl and a Hooligan, The Leningrad Symphony (music by D. D. Shostakovitch ), Straussiana, Valpurginian Night, La boité à joujoux, etc. were staged by the choreographer Marilena. Tóthová. The choreographies of the ballets Daphnis and Chloe, The Miraculous Mandarin, and Francesca da Rimini (music by P. I. Tchaikovsky) were by Jozef Zajko. Leading soloists were A. Herényiová, Z. Červeňáková, T. Pomšár, A. Halász, T. Ivan, and the graduates from the Dance Department of the Conservatory in Bratislava F. Lojeková, J. Haľama, J. Dolinský.

In 1973 Boris Slovák became head of the SND Ballet. He considerably rejuvenated and enlarged the ensemble. Under his leadership they presented an original work Preludio Eroico by M. Vilec, and an interesting version of Bizet´s Carmen adapted by R. K. Schedrin. Jozef Zajko staged some classical works, e.g. The Fountain of Bakhchisaray and Futile Caution. The guest choreographer Pavel Šmok presented Confidential Letters (music by L. Janáček) and Stravinsky´s The Firebird, which caused a political scandal and was taken off the repertoire until 1990. The repertoire was enriched by guests artists – the Hungarian choreographer Sándor Tóth with the ballet An Evening with Mahler, and the Czech choreographer Miroslav Kůra with an interesting staging of Romeo and Juliet. A trio of Slovak choreographers presented their choreographic versions of some famous ballets – Miroslav Štauder staged Pygmalion, (music by J. A. Benda), Jozef Sabovčík Anna Karenina (music by R. K. Schedrin), and Jozef Dolinský Petrushka. Principal dancers were G. Záhradníková, D. Pilzová, V. Zlochová, E. Šenkýříková, Z. Innemanová, Z. Nagy, J. P. Plavnik, P. Dúbravík, D. Nebyla, L. Vaculík, and others.

At the end of the seventies and the beginning of the eighties Karol Tóth returned to the post of the artistic director and continued in the same general direction. The Ballet presented works of Slovak composers, e.g. Magic Night and Poem Macabre (music by E. Suchoň), The Jinxes (music by I. Zeljenka), Soldier and a Mother (music by J. Cikker), choreographies by Karol. Tóth, and also Metamorphoses (music by E. Suchoň), choreography by Jozef Dolinský, and a ballet for children A Bug was Born (music by T. Frešo), choreography by Jozef Zajko. Of Russian provenance the most successful was Spartacus by A. I. Khachaturian staged by Otar M. Dadishkiliani. Other premieres were Three Cards (music by K. V. Molchanov), The Prodigal Son, The Inspector (music by A. B. Tchaikovsky), choreography by Jozef Dolinský, followed by The Legend of Love, Swan Lake, The Nutcracker, etc. Among the best were works by Karol Tóth, such as The Rites of Spring, The Hunchback of Notre Dame (music by M. Jarre), as well as a composition by the Cuban choreographer, Iván Tenorio, The House of Bernarda Alba (music by S. F. Barroso). Other choreographers at that time were Miroslav Kůra and a Slovenian choreographer Henrik Neubauer.

The end of the eighties was for the SND Ballet a time for young artists. Libor Vaculík, choreographer and dancer, presented What Man Tells me, what Love Tells You (music by G. Mahler, B. Martinů), and an evening titled ÓVÓ for Vivaldi compiled of his choreographies such as Vivaldi, Getting Dark, Dialogs – Love, Death, Et Cetera (music by G. Mahler and J. Rodrigo), followed by original works In Memoriam (music by V. Godár), Discrepancies (music by M. Burlas), choreography by Igor Holováč. A spectacular event turned to be the staging of an expressive two-part ballet by two young choreographers titled Lux et Requiem. Its first part was Ecstasy of Ghosts (music by W. A. Mozart) by Robert Balogh and the second part Requiem (music by G. Verdi) by Ondrej Šoth.

In May 1989, Emil Tomáš Bartko, critic and theoretician, takes over the position of the artistic director. The SND Ballet fulfils various creative ambitions pertaining to dramaturgy and culture of movements. The ensemble presents choreographies by Ondrej Šoth: Strange Happiness to Live (music by M. Pavlíček), Light in the Dark (music by M. Ničík), La Dame aux Camelias (a compilation of the works by F. Liszt and R. Wagner), an extremely successful musical for children Snow White and Seven Racers (music by V. Patejdl), choreography of the last two by Libor Vaculík. The French choreographer, Bruno Genty, presents a one-act ballet Words from the Mouth of Angels (music by the group Toxedomoon), the American, Mark Diamond, a miniature Magnificat (music by J. S. Bach), the Swiss, Etienne Frey, an expressive ballet Les Mutants (music by P. Gabriel), and the former principal dancer from New York City Ballet, Christopher d´ Amboise, an anti-drug ballet fantasy The Children of Titanic, music by Slovak composer D. Rapoš. Among premieres we can find an interesting stage adaptation of a Swiss television version of Wedding by Stravinsky, with choreography by P. Šmok, who also staged The Firebird, and the come-back of Carmen, prepared by Boris Slovák.

Classical works were rehearsed and recreated by the guest pedagogue, Rafael G. Avnikjan – The Swan Lake, Don Quixote, etc. as well as The Nutcracker, Coppélia, Lavrovsky´s Paganini based on the version of J. D. Sech, M. M. Fokin´s Sheherazade created by the legendary Nicholas Beriozoff. Many works were staged by the youngest generation of choreographers, e. g. Igor Holováč – Quartet for One (music by I. Zeljenka) and Love, the Magician, Vladimír Marušin – Musica Slovaca (music by I. Zeljenka), Ján Ďurovčík – The Rites of Spring. At that time the general intention was to stage a wide range of works interesting for the audience and the ensemble as well. During the next seven years new faces appeared on stage – soloists I. Čierniková, N. Gallovičová, I. Murčeková-Kačiaková, A. Svobodová, N. Stehlíková, J. Dolinský, Jr., J. Goga, I. Holováč, J. Šiška, J. Vasilenko, M. Radačovský, L. Hýllová, M. Zábavík, and R. Lazík, who in 1996 brought home the first medal from the World Competition in New York.

This phase ended due to some outside circumstances in 1996 when for a short time the position of Director of the SND Ballet was taken over by Gabriela Záhradniková (1996 – 1997). The quality of the ensemble went visibly down. In 1997 – 1998 it was Jozef Sabovčík whose staging of Spartacus brought this period to a close.

The comeback of Emil T. Bartko to the position of Director in 1999 meant that many excellent dancers returned to the SND – I. Holováč, R. Lazík, L. Alpijeva, etc., as well as ballet masters R. G. Avnikjan and I. Čierniková. And suddenly there again was space for a wide range of different works and choreographies. From pure orthodox classical ballets such as Giselle, La Bayadère, staged by Rafael G. Avnikjan and Karin Alaverdjan, Sleeping Beauty staged by Bachram M. Juldashev and Jozef Dolinský, the Nutcracker, through Magnificat, Sheherazade, Classical Symphony to the works staged by our own choreographers – Ondrej Šoth Carmina Burana – Requiem (music by C. Orff – G. Verdi), and a miniature Adagietto (music by G.Mahler), the choreographic debut of Jozef Dolinský, Jr. with a fantasy A Wish (music by H. Tóth) and Ján Ďurovčík with the innovated The Rites of Spring. On May 19, 2000 the 80th anniversary of the SND Ballet was celebrated by a gala concert where, in addition to our dancers, guest performers from Budapest, Moscow, Paris and Vienna participated.

In 2001 three works were staged. The first one was the most famous ballet Romeo and Juliet based on the choreography by Nichlas Beriozoff and recreated by Riccardo Duse and Jozef Dolinský. Then the version of the M. Jarre´s ballet The Hunchback of Notre Dame, with choreography by Libor Vaculik followed, and the last one was an original fairy tale ballet A Bug was Born (music by T. Frešo), a new choreography – production by Igor Holováč and libretto by N. Slovák.

The world´s premiere of Ján Ďurovčík´s Rasputin (music by H. Leško) opened the door to original works, such as Caligula by Igor Holováč (music by H. Leško).

The ballet ensemble is now represented by a new young generation of dancers – V. Henschová, L. Holečková, E. Jenčková, A. Kršková, E. Petráková,N. Poláková, V. Šimončíková, M. Blahuta, J. Černuška, A. Kremz, R. Novitzky and also by dancers from abroad – T. Nomura, S. Mühlbauer-Peron, C. M. Zaharia, M. Zheleznyakova, H. Baluch, A. Ducin.
The beginnings of the Slovak ballet go back to the historic day of the first ballet premiere of Coppélia by C. Ph. L. Delibes on May 19, 1920. The choreography was by Vaclav Kalina, the first artistic director of the SND Ballet. In the season 1922 – 1923 this position was taken over by Czech dancer Marta Aubrechtová.

Oskar Nedbal, Director of the SND, invited the Italian ballet master and choreographer Achille Viscusi to Bratislava for the season 1923 – 1924. For the next eight years Viscusi was playing an important role in professionalizing the ensemble as well as the repertoire. He staged such works as From Fairy Tale to Fairy Tale, A Tale about John, Princess Hyacinth, and Andersen (music by O. Nedbal), Slavonic Dances (music by A. Dvořák), The Swan Lake, The Nutcracker, Giselle, Sheherazade, Sylvia (music by L. Delibes), etc. In the years 1931 – 1933 the position of Viscusi was taken over by his pupil, the dancer Ella Fuchsová- Lehotská, who was also known for her private ballet school. The ensemble presented Nicotina (music by V. Novák), The Firebird, Mr. Twardowski (music by L. Roźycki), and many more. The other principal dancers, apart from Fuchsová-Lehotská, were among others O. Janatová-Doušová, A. and I. Vésceyová, V. Jassik, I. R. Stuchlý, J. Jercký, E. Gabzdyl.

After this very successful period other Czech choreographers followed. In 1933 – 1935 Vladimir Pirnikov with the ballet Raymonda, then again E. Fuchsová-Lehotská with Ajanta Frescoes (music by A. N. Tcherepnin), and finally Bohumil Relský with The Christmas Eve Dream (music by M. S. Anger), and A Wedding in the Ukraine (music by O. Fröhlich) in the season of 1937 – 1940. At that time the principal dancers were E. Kováčová, N. Pirniková, M. Chocová, E. Velínska, G. Schmidtová, E. Šajová-Jaczová, V. Libovický, and others.

Between 1940 – 1945 Director of the SND was Maximilián Froman, the representative of the Russian ballet school and member of the world-famous ensemble Ballets Russes. He acquainted the public with the repertoire of Diaghilev’s ensemble by presenting such works as Sheherazade, Les Papillons, Carnival, Polovetz Dances, Sylfides and The Sleeping Beauty. The ensemble also presented ballets by the Croatian composer K. Baranovič Imbrek with a Nose and The Gingerbread Heart. At that time the ensemble was joined by the Bulgarian ballerina M. Vasileva and by B. Füssegger.

In the years 1948 – 1955 Stanislav Remar markedly influenced the dramaturgy of the SND Ballet by presenting the first Slovak ballet Orfeus and Eurydike by T. Andrašovan (1949), and by staging works such as The Flames of Paris, The Fountain of Bakhchisaray, Prokofiev´s Cinderella and Romeo and Juliet, and by foreign guest choreographers: the representative of the Russian school, Alexander R.Tomsky, who staged The Red Poppy (music by R. M. Glier), and the Hungarian choreographer, Gyula Harangozó, who staged The Kerchief (music by J. Kenessey). Next was Jozef Zajko, the first Slovak theatrical choreographer, who staged the first ballet with Slovak motif The Knight´s Ballad by Šimon Jurovský (1960). Soloists were T. Isičenková, G. Basová, A. Herényi-Starostová, J. Manšingrová, G. Tašká-Boudová, J. Mňačková, J. Zajko, T. Beňo, F. O. Bernatik, M. Herényi, V. Marek, L. Lejko, H. Volejníček, P. M. Rapoš, etc.

The coming of Karol Tóth to the post of the artistic director of the SND Ballet (1960 – 1972) marked new independence of the ensemble. His first choreography was Fadetta by L. Delibes. During his leadership Marilena Tóthová and Jozef Zajko took part in creating the repertoire. The SND Ballet presented important premieres of some original works, e.g. Ikaros (music by T. Andrašovan), The Ninth Wave (music by K. Odstrčil), The Command (music by V. Bukový), and ballets such as Voyage in a Storm (music by A. Kara-Karajev), The Scythian Suite (music by S. S. Prokofiev), Don Quixote, Servant of Two Masters (music by J. Burghauser), Snow White and Seven Dwarfs (music by Z. Vostřák), The Rites of Spring, Love, the Magician, Peter and Wolf – choreography by Karol. Tóth. The ballets Doctor Auch (music by I. V. Morozov), Girl and a Hooligan, The Leningrad Symphony (music by D. D. Shostakovitch ), Straussiana, Valpurginian Night, La boité à joujoux, etc. were staged by the choreographer Marilena. Tóthová. The choreographies of the ballets Daphnis and Chloe, The Miraculous Mandarin, and Francesca da Rimini (music by P. I. Tchaikovsky) were by Jozef Zajko. Leading soloists were A. Herényiová, Z. Červeňáková, T. Pomšár, A. Halász, T. Ivan, and the graduates from the Dance Department of the Conservatory in Bratislava F. Lojeková, J. Haľama, J. Dolinský.

In 1973 Boris Slovák became head of the SND Ballet. He considerably rejuvenated and enlarged the ensemble. Under his leadership they presented an original work Preludio Eroico by M. Vilec, and an interesting version of Bizet´s Carmen adapted by R. K. Schedrin. Jozef Zajko staged some classical works, e.g. The Fountain of Bakhchisaray and Futile Caution. The guest choreographer Pavel Šmok presented Confidential Letters (music by L. Janáček) and Stravinsky´s The Firebird, which caused a political scandal and was taken off the repertoire until 1990. The repertoire was enriched by guests artists – the Hungarian choreographer Sándor Tóth with the ballet An Evening with Mahler, and the Czech choreographer Miroslav Kůra with an interesting staging of Romeo and Juliet. A trio of Slovak choreographers presented their choreographic versions of some famous ballets – Miroslav Štauder staged Pygmalion, (music by J. A. Benda), Jozef Sabovčík Anna Karenina (music by R. K. Schedrin), and Jozef Dolinský Petrushka. Principal dancers were G. Záhradníková, D. Pilzová, V. Zlochová, E. Šenkýříková, Z. Innemanová, Z. Nagy, J. P. Plavnik, P. Dúbravík, D. Nebyla, L. Vaculík, and others.

At the end of the seventies and the beginning of the eighties Karol Tóth returned to the post of the artistic director and continued in the same general direction. The Ballet presented works of Slovak composers, e.g. Magic Night and Poem Macabre (music by E. Suchoň), The Jinxes (music by I. Zeljenka), Soldier and a Mother (music by J. Cikker), choreographies by Karol. Tóth, and also Metamorphoses (music by E. Suchoň), choreography by Jozef Dolinský, and a ballet for children A Bug was Born (music by T. Frešo), choreography by Jozef Zajko. Of Russian provenance the most successful was Spartacus by A. I. Khachaturian staged by Otar M. Dadishkiliani. Other premieres were Three Cards (music by K. V. Molchanov), The Prodigal Son, The Inspector (music by A. B. Tchaikovsky), choreography by Jozef Dolinský, followed by The Legend of Love, Swan Lake, The Nutcracker, etc. Among the best were works by Karol Tóth, such as The Rites of Spring, The Hunchback of Notre Dame (music by M. Jarre), as well as a composition by the Cuban choreographer, Iván Tenorio, The House of Bernarda Alba (music by S. F. Barroso). Other choreographers at that time were Miroslav Kůra and a Slovenian choreographer Henrik Neubauer.

The end of the eighties was for the SND Ballet a time for young artists. Libor Vaculík, choreographer and dancer, presented What Man Tells me, what Love Tells You (music by G. Mahler, B. Martinů), and an evening titled ÓVÓ for Vivaldi compiled of his choreographies such as Vivaldi, Getting Dark, Dialogs – Love, Death, Et Cetera (music by G. Mahler and J. Rodrigo), followed by original works In Memoriam (music by V. Godár), Discrepancies (music by M. Burlas), choreography by Igor Holováč. A spectacular event turned to be the staging of an expressive two-part ballet by two young choreographers titled Lux et Requiem. Its first part was Ecstasy of Ghosts (music by W. A. Mozart) by Robert Balogh and the second part Requiem (music by G. Verdi) by Ondrej Šoth.

In May 1989, Emil Tomáš Bartko, critic and theoretician, takes over the position of the artistic director. The SND Ballet fulfils various creative ambitions pertaining to dramaturgy and culture of movements. The ensemble presents choreographies by Ondrej Šoth: Strange Happiness to Live (music by M. Pavlíček), Light in the Dark (music by M. Ničík), La Dame aux Camelias (a compilation of the works by F. Liszt and R. Wagner), an extremely successful musical for children Snow White and Seven Racers (music by V. Patejdl), choreography of the last two by Libor Vaculík. The French choreographer, Bruno Genty, presents a one-act ballet Words from the Mouth of Angels (music by the group Toxedomoon), the American, Mark Diamond, a miniature Magnificat (music by J. S. Bach), the Swiss, Etienne Frey, an expressive ballet Les Mutants (music by P. Gabriel), and the former principal dancer from New York City Ballet, Christopher d´ Amboise, an anti-drug ballet fantasy The Children of Titanic, music by Slovak composer D. Rapoš. Among premieres we can find an interesting stage adaptation of a Swiss television version of Wedding by Stravinsky, with choreography by P. Šmok, who also staged The Firebird, and the come-back of Carmen, prepared by Boris Slovák.

Classical works were rehearsed and recreated by the guest pedagogue, Rafael G. Avnikjan – The Swan Lake, Don Quixote, etc. as well as The Nutcracker, Coppélia, Lavrovsky´s Paganini based on the version of J. D. Sech, M. M. Fokin´s Sheherazade created by the legendary Nicholas Beriozoff. Many works were staged by the youngest generation of choreographers, e. g. Igor Holováč – Quartet for One (music by I. Zeljenka) and Love, the Magician, Vladimír Marušin – Musica Slovaca (music by I. Zeljenka), Ján Ďurovčík – The Rites of Spring. At that time the general intention was to stage a wide range of works interesting for the audience and the ensemble as well. During the next seven years new faces appeared on stage – soloists I. Čierniková, N. Gallovičová, I. Murčeková-Kačiaková, A. Svobodová, N. Stehlíková, J. Dolinský, Jr., J. Goga, I. Holováč, J. Šiška, J. Vasilenko, M. Radačovský, L. Hýllová, M. Zábavík, and R. Lazík, who in 1996 brought home the first medal from the World Competition in New York.

This phase ended due to some outside circumstances in 1996 when for a short time the position of Director of the SND Ballet was taken over by Gabriela Záhradniková (1996 – 1997). The quality of the ensemble went visibly down. In 1997 – 1998 it was Jozef Sabovčík whose staging of Spartacus brought this period to a close.

The comeback of Emil T. Bartko to the position of Director in 1999 meant that many excellent dancers returned to the SND – I. Holováč, R. Lazík, L. Alpijeva, etc., as well as ballet masters R. G. Avnikjan and I. Čierniková. And suddenly there again was space for a wide range of different works and choreographies. From pure orthodox classical ballets such as Giselle, La Bayadère, staged by Rafael G. Avnikjan and Karin Alaverdjan, Sleeping Beauty staged by Bachram M. Juldashev and Jozef Dolinský, the Nutcracker, through Magnificat, Sheherazade, Classical Symphony to the works staged by our own choreographers – Ondrej Šoth Carmina Burana – Requiem (music by C. Orff – G. Verdi), and a miniature Adagietto (music by G.Mahler), the choreographic debut of Jozef Dolinský, Jr. with a fantasy A Wish (music by H. Tóth) and Ján Ďurovčík with the innovated The Rites of Spring. On May 19, 2000 the 80th anniversary of the SND Ballet was celebrated by a gala concert where, in addition to our dancers, guest performers from Budapest, Moscow, Paris and Vienna participated.

In 2001 three works were staged. The first one was the most famous ballet Romeo and Juliet based on the choreography by Nichlas Beriozoff and recreated by Riccardo Duse and Jozef Dolinský. Then the version of the M. Jarre´s ballet The Hunchback of Notre Dame, with choreography by Libor Vaculik followed, and the last one was an original fairy tale ballet A Bug was Born (music by T. Frešo), a new choreography – production by Igor Holováč and libretto by N. Slovák.

The world´s premiere of Ján Ďurovčík´s Rasputin (music by H. Leško) opened the door to original works, such as Caligula by Igor Holováč (music by H. Leško).

The ballet ensemble is now represented by a new young generation of dancers – V. Henschová, L. Holečková, E. Jenčková, A. Kršková, E. Petráková,N. Poláková, V. Šimončíková, M. Blahuta, J. Černuška, A. Kremz, R. Novitzky and also by dancers from abroad – T. Nomura, S. Mühlbauer-Peron, C. M. Zaharia, M. Zheleznyakova, H. Baluch, A. Ducin.

Balet BratislavaBalet Bratislava

Balet Bratislava is an independent professional repertory dance company with a focus on neoclassical dance. The mission of the company is to bring professional, artistic, first-class dance productions to Slovak audiences and to promote dance through educational activities.

The ambition of Balet Bratislava is to fill the void between traditional and technically demanding productions of large companies and the low-budget projects mounted by small, independent groups in the area of modern and contemporary dance. Our aim is to gain recognition both in Slovakia and abroad through a high artistic and technical level of dancing as well as a distinguished repertoire; and to present our work in theatres and major art festivals.

The programming of the company focuses mainly on works representing the mainstream of current European dance as well as on works by renowned choreographers from Slovakia and abroad. The company´s goal is to search for and stage attractive and top quality choreographies and to create a platform for new and original dance projects. Balet Bratislava is an independent professional repertory dance company with a focus on neoclassical dance. The mission of the company is to bring professional, artistic, first-class dance productions to Slovak audiences and to promote dance through educational activities.

The ambition of Balet Bratislava is to fill the void between traditional and technically demanding productions of large companies and the low-budget projects mounted by small, independent groups in the area of modern and contemporary dance. Our aim is to gain recognition both in Slovakia and abroad through a high artistic and technical level of dancing as well as a distinguished repertoire; and to present our work in theatres and major art festivals.

The programming of the company focuses mainly on works representing the mainstream of current European dance as well as on works by renowned choreographers from Slovakia and abroad. The company´s goal is to search for and stage attractive and top quality choreographies and to create a platform for new and original dance projects.

Slovenian National BalletSlovenian National Ballet

It may seem that the institutionalised theatre, and Musical Theatre and Ballet in particular, have existed in Slovenia for a rather short period of time, especially when compared to other European milieus. However, if we take into account all the historical circumstances, we may untie ourselves of all the restraints and look back into our past with pride. The history of our stage has been varied and very much alive, especially because many years passed before it was really taken over by the Slovenian artists and creators, who mostly became members of our permanent ensembles. And, more than 90 years have passed, since the times, when the Ljubljana Ballet Ensemble made its first steps towards professionalism and was soon followed by the Orchestra of our Opera Theatre.

Let us skim through some important events that marked these past decades. When the Slovenian Regional Theatre obtained its new building (today’s Opera Theatre) in 1892, both Slovene and German theatre and opera performances were staged in it. In this theatre the Slovenian Opera was finally able to engage its permanent conductors, soloists and choir. The performances were first accompanied by hired military musicians and from 1908 on by the members of the newly founded Slovenian Philharmonics. In 1911, the performances of the German ensemble were moved to a new building (today’s Drama Theatre). During World War I, the muses in the Ljubljana Opera fell silent and the theatre building became home to the Cinema Central until – in the spring of 1918 – the theatre consortium decided to finally realise its goal and reopen the Slovenian stage for the 1918/1919 season. Thus, the Slovenian music and theatre scene was revived during the autumn of the same year, even so that the theatre and opera performances could be complemented by the ballet spectacles as well.

At that time, our opera programme was mostly marked by the best French and Italian repertoire, however, a substantial emphasis was also given to some Slav and especially Slovenian operatic works. In the period between the two world wars, the Opera Theatre modernised its repertoire and several successful operas by the Slovenian composers Kogoj, Osterc and Bravničar were staged as well. After World War II the Ljubljana Opera Ensemble gained esteem and respect abroad as well. The opera The Love for Three Oranges became a tremendous success during its international tour in the Netherlands, and particularly its triumphant performance at the Paris Opera. In 1957, the recording of Sergei Prokofiev’s opera The Love for Three Oranges under the baton of the renowned Slovenian conductor Bogo Leskovic, was awarded the Phillips Grand Prix as the world’s Best Recording of the Year.

In the beginning of the 1918/19 season the first performances of the opera and operetta productions with the participation of the Slovenian Ballet Ensemble, led by its own Artistic Director, were put on the stage, and in the spring of 1919 the first independent ballet – The Abduction of Evelyne – was finally premiered too. In the Ballet’s very first professional years, a number of famous classical pieces were already performed however its repertoire also contained some modern Slovenian works. To this day the audience in Ljubljana has been able to attend to many different productions from classical ballet repertoire, and also to quite a number of new dance creations, staged by both Slovenian and foreign choreographers. It may seem that the institutionalised theatre, and Musical Theatre and Ballet in particular, have existed in Slovenia for a rather short period of time, especially when compared to other European milieus. However, if we take into account all the historical circumstances, we may untie ourselves of all the restraints and look back into our past with pride. The history of our stage has been varied and very much alive, especially because many years passed before it was really taken over by the Slovenian artists and creators, who mostly became members of our permanent ensembles. And, more than 90 years have passed, since the times, when the Ljubljana Ballet Ensemble made its first steps towards professionalism and was soon followed by the Orchestra of our Opera Theatre.

Let us skim through some important events that marked these past decades. When the Slovenian Regional Theatre obtained its new building (today’s Opera Theatre) in 1892, both Slovene and German theatre and opera performances were staged in it. In this theatre the Slovenian Opera was finally able to engage its permanent conductors, soloists and choir. The performances were first accompanied by hired military musicians and from 1908 on by the members of the newly founded Slovenian Philharmonics. In 1911, the performances of the German ensemble were moved to a new building (today’s Drama Theatre). During World War I, the muses in the Ljubljana Opera fell silent and the theatre building became home to the Cinema Central until – in the spring of 1918 – the theatre consortium decided to finally realise its goal and reopen the Slovenian stage for the 1918/1919 season. Thus, the Slovenian music and theatre scene was revived during the autumn of the same year, even so that the theatre and opera performances could be complemented by the ballet spectacles as well.

At that time, our opera programme was mostly marked by the best French and Italian repertoire, however, a substantial emphasis was also given to some Slav and especially Slovenian operatic works. In the period between the two world wars, the Opera Theatre modernised its repertoire and several successful operas by the Slovenian composers Kogoj, Osterc and Bravničar were staged as well. After World War II the Ljubljana Opera Ensemble gained esteem and respect abroad as well. The opera The Love for Three Oranges became a tremendous success during its international tour in the Netherlands, and particularly its triumphant performance at the Paris Opera. In 1957, the recording of Sergei Prokofiev’s opera The Love for Three Oranges under the baton of the renowned Slovenian conductor Bogo Leskovic, was awarded the Phillips Grand Prix as the world’s Best Recording of the Year.

In the beginning of the 1918/19 season the first performances of the opera and operetta productions with the participation of the Slovenian Ballet Ensemble, led by its own Artistic Director, were put on the stage, and in the spring of 1919 the first independent ballet – The Abduction of Evelyne – was finally premiered too. In the Ballet’s very first professional years, a number of famous classical pieces were already performed however its repertoire also contained some modern Slovenian works. To this day the audience in Ljubljana has been able to attend to many different productions from classical ballet repertoire, and also to quite a number of new dance creations, staged by both Slovenian and foreign choreographers.